Saturday, July 26, 2008

Black Krim Tomato

2008_0726image0007

This is one of the tomatoes on my Heirloom Black Krim.  I rushed out and bought this plant from the grocery store on the advice of Margaret after all my tomato seedlings perished in the grow rack crash of 2008.  Damned Chicago wind!

So far I've not found the Heirloom tomatoes any more difficult to grow than the hybrids I've grown.  So far.  These tomatoes are really heavy so I've needed to keep a close watch on them making sure to tie up any limbs that are close to the ground. 

I wonder how much longer I'll need to wait for this little lovely to be ready for the pickin?  I've never had Black Krims before and I absolutely can't wait. 

13 comments:

  1. I've never had 'Black Krim' tomatoes, either, but have heard they are good. It should be too much longer!

    Carol, May Dreams Gardens

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  2. I just read something about the black/dark tomatoes comparing them to red wine, as in the heavier, richer flavor. Now I wish I had one!

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  3. I grew Black Krim last year and they came out great - My husband said they had a smoky taste and were perfect for BLT's.

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  4. That's a purty tomato, Gina! We're growing Brandywines this year and it seems to be a heavyweight, too. We've never grown them before this year.

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  5. Man I am jealous! My plants dont even have flowers yet! When did you plant this baby?

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  6. Nice looking tomato! I am growing that variety for the first time this year, as well.

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  7. I love Black Krim! Very good flaver and grows pretty fast too. Last year I wrote a post about them. It was kindof hard to tell when to pick them. They do get a bit darker than regular red tomatoes but the tops (the shoulders) stay green. I've got better pictures on a later post here.

    Good luck with your Black Krims. I think you will really like them!

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  8. I think I've found a kindred spirit here!

    I grew the Black Krims last year, and they are delicious. My problem was that I couldn't get past the appearance...they looked sort of rotten. I also canned several quarts of tomatoes last year, and you could sure tell which ones were the Krims. They looked awful, but we ate them anyway.

    Here are pics from last year (first row) so you can get an idea of what they look like when ripe.

    http://www.julilawrence.com/nggallery/page-68/page-2/

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  9. Congratulations on discovering this wonderful Ukrainian tomato!

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  10. I just discovered Black Krim last week. Sounds interesting and hope it will do well (with extra fertilizer) in a 5 gallon pot. Also not so sure about our S.California heat. Can hardly wait to try my first one.

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  11. I am growing BK's for the 2nd year. Their taste is so diverse, depending on when you pick them and how they are served.

    This year I have built an 'earthtainer' to grow them in...the results are 10x the flowers and fruit so far, over last year.

    Highly recommend looking up 'Earthtainer' on google and see if it will work for you!

    Rick in Monterey, CA.

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  12. Black Krims are among the best heirloom tomatoes you can grow. They produce a lot of fruit, the fruit grows to a good size, and they taste great! The only problem they have is a cosmetic one; the tomatoes tend to "crack" as they grow, leaving scars on the skin, usually spreading out from the stem to about halfway down the tomato. That doesn't affect the fruit itself, though, and you can very easily cut away the scar if it bugs you. Get Krims if you can! They are amazing in look and flavor!

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  13. Hello America! We're growing Black Krim here in Manchester England - they look about the same stage as yours colour wise - although our biggest one is the size of a large fist! We are so looking forward to eating them - just wish we had a little more sunshine!

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