Thursday, May 22, 2008

A Year In The Life Of Semi-Dwarf Bell Of Georgia Peach

Last year the week after I planted my first kitchen garden I bought this little homely peach tree from Home Depot. It's a Semi-Dwarf Bell of Georgia.

I complain all the time about being from the south but when it comes right down to it, I sorta miss some things about it. And even though I'm not from Georgia, I am well versed in the deliciousness of the Georgia Peach. So, when Mr. Wonderful said he'd like me to grow some peaches, I picked this variety hoping to plant a little of my southern heritage in my yard. Check out the "flower bed" in the picture below. Boy that brings back memories of sod and weed removal last year. I dug a hole and plopped it in and watered it when I remembered.
Here it is this morning. It's kinda wild looking and I suppose I should prune it some day but I don't know how to do that either. It's done really well in this spot but I'm worried that it's going to outgrow this space fast.
After I planted this tree, a guy I work with who lived on a farm with an actual orchard told me that I may as well dig this up and throw it in the trash because I'd never get a peach tree to bear fruit in Chicago. He says it's too cold. Well, that's OK too. I still think it's pretty.

8 comments:

  1. I am not sure what zone you are in, but here in 6B we get lots of peaches. I live in a city and there is a peach tree a few blocks away in a vacant lot - we forage peaches from it. They are a bit small, and often bee-stung, but they are peaches nonetheless. There are also commercial orchards here, and backyard peach trees. So, I know they grow further north than Georgia! Ignore the naysayers and keep on growing your tree. I would definitely look into pruning, through - it makes a difference, right from the beginning. You could train the tree so that it works for that space.

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  2. Not true! Not true! A fellow I worked with had a peach tree and he had bags and bags of peaches.
    And he lives even farther north than you do. I agree with Matriarchy completely. Look on line how to prune a peach tree for maximum beauty and peaches. I love the pale pink flowers you included. (I had really good luck for quite a while with growing nectarines, so you won't have any trouble with peaches.) Have a great holiday.

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  3. Hmpf. I KNOW that people grow peaches up here in Cleveland... so why the heck not in Chicago, too?! I just planted a peach tree myself, so it's fun to see how much growth yours has put on in a year, Gina.

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  4. Absolutely right: you CAN grow peaches there, Gina. You just have to protect the flowers from frost; that's what stops the fruit. Northern gardeners usually grow apricots and peaches as espalier trees (ie trained up against a south-facing wall) with some means of protecting the blossom and budding fruit until danger of frost has passed. Bit of a hassle, of course, but it CAN be done.

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  5. Happy birthday to you! I went to the link and read the first post and LOL at the 'lazy bastard' comment! I don't think so! Your posts often make me laugh and the world is a better place for your garden and blog! If anyone can grow peaches in Chicago, you can!

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  6. That's ridiculous - I've seen peach trees loaded with fruit on garden tours here in Chicago. You may need to make sure you have the right variety and a protected place, but you can certainly grow peaches here!

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  7. Yes, you can grow them where you are! I agree you might have to protect it from frost in the spring, but that's not so bad when you think of the benefits!

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  8. thank you all for the vote of confidence! I sure hope you are right!

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